Tag Archives: PR

@goodlaura explains it all to us: Sacramento Charity Daily

In yesterday’s blog post, I shared my recent discovery of Sacramento News Daily and Sacramento Charity Daily, which Sacramento non-profits should consider as they work to engage more people in supporting their missions.  To take advantage of Sacramento Charity Daily, non-profits have to tweet and include links to longer articles they post in blogs or on their websites.

Laura Good, a.k.a. @goodlaura, was kind enough to respond to the questions I sent her.  If you don’t know Laura, you should.  The woman has 6,819 people following her on Twitter and has sent 47,830 tweets – a number that will no doubt increase by the time you read this (no wonder the first line of her Twitter profile is “Twitter Junkie”).

Here’s a key bit of advice worth reading, as well as her full responses to my questions, below (and waaaay at the bottom some links you should check out):

My advice is that charities invest time in establishing a Facebook Page and a Twitter account, if they don’t already have one.   And once those are established, that they try to post content at least once a day during “prime time” – about 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. (anecdotal—this is my own observation) Monday through Friday.  Weekends are the absolute worst time to post content as activity on both Facebook and Twitter drops way off.  Posting time is a little less important on Facebook but it is absolutely critical on Twitter.

1)      When did you launch Sacramento News Daily and Sacramento Charity Daily to the public?

I don’t remember the exact date, but it was several months ago—maybe October or November.

2)  Your Twitter profile says you’re a program director with SARTA.org.  SARTA has a very nice website that does a great job of feeding news relevant to the organization’s technology focus.  Is that how you became interested in the potential of aggregating and feeding relevant content via the Internet?

I don’t think that what I do for SARTA influenced my decision—I was actually very passionate about the power of social media before I started working for SARTA in September of 2008.  I’ve applied my passion to SARTA’s website and social media presence as well as to my volunteer role with the Sacramento Social Media Club.  I post much of the social media content for Sacramento Social Media Club and for 2011, I am the volunteer Executive Director.  Back to the question… my primary interest area in social media is in connecting the community/building community.  I follow/friend people and organizations in the Sacramento region and promote causes and events I think would be of interest to those in the region via Facebook and Twitter.  I have a particular heart for philanthropic organizations* and try to use my social media influence to help promote them.  This is why I created the sac-charity Twitter list and the Sacramento Charity Daily.

(*Laura later clarified that she loves animals and animal-related causes fall within her definition.)

3)      Sacramento News Daily and Sacramento Charity Daily appear to be running on a platform called paper.li developed by SmallRivers.  (Nice looking, by the way.)  Did you reach out and find SmallRivers or did they reach out to you?

I found out about paper.li through a tweet from someone I follow on Twitter and then did a little research on my own about the application.  I started the Sacramento Daily News first, as I had already cultivated a pretty good list of local media on Twitter and then began cultivating the Sacramento Charity list with the idea of promoting them via the paper.li app.  A lot of the “papers” created are a bit worthless in my opinion – for example you can create one that aggregates information from everyone you follow on Twitter.  I want my papers to have a real focus and be of value to those who take the time to click on the promo tweet and then read them. This is why I’ve only created paper.li papers from my cultivated lists.  I also have one called “Sac Family Fun Daily.”  The goal for that paper is to promote activities in the Sacramento region that families might enjoy.

4)      Why did you decide to create Sacramento Charity Daily as a separate online news channel, vs. making it a component of Sacramento News Daily?

Sacramento News Daily only includes those who are professional journalists and/or news media organizations like News10, The Sacramento Bee, etc.  I review the paper from time to time to make sure that those I’ve included on the list really are tweeting news. If they are using their twitter account for more personal reasons, I may decide to take them off the sac-media list.  Not that there is anything wrong with personal tweets—most of mine are of that nature.  I just want to make sure the “paper” really is news. I created a separate paper for Sacramento Charity Daily because I didn’t want to bury news about Sacramento Charities in the Sacramento News Daily paper.  I have 163 accounts on my sac-media list and only 48 (so far!) on my sac-charity list.  I think that each of the papers may appeal to a different audience.  People who don’t really care to see a summary of Sacramento news from Twitter may care quite a bit about what local charities are doing.

5)      Do you find all of the content you post from tweets? Or do you use other sources besides Twitter?

Paper.li allows me to create the twitter list that the ‘paper” will pull content from. There is no way for me to add other content to what is reported each day, other than creating an editorial note (which I have not yet done).

6)      And now for advice. Most nonprofits post news on their websites.  How do they let you know when they’ve posted something interesting?  And, pragmatically, is the link to the organization website good enough, even though there will likely be other stuff on the page?

As you see from my answer to Question 4 there isn’t a way for me to add info from outside of what an organization tweets.  If they have a twitter account (and are based in the Sacramento region) they should let me know so I can follow them and add them to my sac-charity list. Then, they should tweet at least daily including links (paper.li only includes tweets with links to web content).  I don’t include all regional non-profits on my sac-charity list. I am primarily looking to promote philanthropic organizations that help individuals.  Originally, my list was broader than that but I’m working to fine tune it.  I have added some national charities that were “nominated” by Sacramentans to be included on the list but as more Sacramento based charities are added, I may remove them. For now, I also have non-profits that support the arts in Sacramento on the list.

Sacramento is Number 4 in the nation for  business use of Twitter. It makes sense for charities in this region to have a presence on Twitter because our community is so engaged on Twitter.  My advice is that charities invest time in establishing a Facebook Page and a Twitter account, if they don’t already have one.   And once those are established, that they try to post content at least once a day during “prime time” – about 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. (anecdotal—this is my own observation) Monday through Friday.  Weekends are the absolute worst time to post content as activity on both Facebook and Twitter drops way off.  Posting time is a little less important on Facebook but it is absolutely critical on Twitter.

7)      Are you the editorial decision maker?  Or is the process automated?

The process is automatic on paper.li. The only editorial decisions I make is who is on my sac-charity list and what time the paper is produced/broadcast via twitter each day.  I don’t even decide which twitter users from within the list will be featured in the daily tweet.  The good news about this limitation is that I can spread the word about charities with very little effort on my part, other than cultivating a good Twitter list.  I can add an editorial comment to the paper but I’ve never done that.  There is also an option to create a paper using different criteria than a twitter list – #tags for instance.  And there is a more advanced feature I have yet to try that lets you specify who to include and to filter on key words.

8)      What kind of content are you looking for?

It’s my hope that charitable organizations within the region will tweet about their cause and include links to web content that further explains their cause, activities, fund raising campaigns, events, etc.

9)      What length should news items be to be most compatible with re-posting on your daily news sites?

I don’t think this matters in what paper.li decides to include.  The key is that it is web content and a link to the content is tweeted.

10)      What do you wish I’d asked that I didn’t?

A lot of charitable organizations have limited resources – both people and funding. Social media is a low cost way to both share the message and to engage with those who care about your cause.  You don’t have to be an expert to create a Facebook page or a Twitter account—nor do you have to pay an expert to do it for you. If you’d like some advice, there are many low cost and even free seminars that provide tips on how to create an effective Facebook Page or Twitter account.  The Sacramento Social Media Club has monthly events and quarterly workshops that do just this.  There is a lot of great content on the internet on how non-profits can effectively use social media.  I also recommend that non-profits look at how other non-profits are successfully using social media and learn from them.  And  a final tip – if a charitable organization has a Facebook Page or Twitter Account, it should be featured on the home page of their website with a link to “Like” or “Follow.”

Additional info:

My Twitter account:

http://twitter.com/goodlaura

Sacramento Social Media Club

Twitter:  http://twitter.com/SMCSac

Facebook:  http://www.facebook.com/SMCSAC

Links to My Twitter Lists mentioned in this article:

http://twitter.com/goodlaura/sac-charity

http://twitter.com/goodlaura/sac-media

http://twitter.com/goodlaura/sac-family-fun

Links to my Paper.li “papers”

http://paper.li/goodlaura/sac-charity

http://paper.li/goodlaura/sac-family-fun

http://paper.li/goodlaura/sac-media

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Sacramento News Daily and Sacramento Charity News

 

I’m always on the hunt for local communication channels that nonprofits can use to inform and build relationships with target audiences, especially as traditional news resources have dried up.  I found a new one (new to me at least), and I wanted you to know about it.  It’s Sacramento News Daily.

 

I dusted off my Twitter account yesterday, and lo and behold, saw this tweet from @goodlaura:

 

I checked it out and, at first blush, it didn’t look that different than outside.in and some of the other Internet-based news aggregators.  So I asked Laura to explain how it added value.

She tweeted back: The information is gathered from those on my sac-media twitter list. It’s a daily summary of Sacramento region news.

And then: Not everyone will find value in it but a number of people have advised me that they enjoy reading it.

And then:  I also have a paper.li “paper” for my sac-charity list. Because I have a lot of Sac followers, it helps spread their msg [She later sent the link to it.]

She also told me, via direct message: I want to start coaching the charities on my list to tweet relevant links daily so they will be included but haven’t yet.

Check back here for a post of an email interview with Laura.  Inquiring minds want to know a little about the back story and more about how to jump aboard:

1) When did you launch Sacramento News Daily and Sacramento Charity Daily to the public?

2) Your Twitter profile says you’re a program director with SARTA.org.  SARTA has a very nice website that does a great job of feeding news relevant to the organization’s technology focus.  Is that how you became interested in the potential of aggregating and feeding relevant content via the Internet?

3)  Sacramento News Daily and Sacramento Charity Daily appear to be running on a platform called paper.li developed by SmallRivers.  (Nice looking, by the way.)  Did you reach out and find SmallRivers or did they reach out to you?

4)  Why did you decide to create Sacramento Charity Daily as a separate online news channel, vs. making it a component of Sacramento News Daily?

5)  Do you find all of the content you post from tweets? Or do you use other sources besides Twitter?

6)  And now for advice. Most nonprofits post news on their websites.  How do they let you know when they’ve posted something interesting?  And, pragmatically, is the link to the organization website good enough, even though there will likely be other stuff on the page?

7)  Are you the editorial decision maker?  Or is the process automated?

8)  What kind of content are you looking for?

9)  What length should news items be to be most compatible with re-posting on your daily news sites?

10)  What do you wish I’d asked that I didn’t?


 

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The new PR for non-profits: an emerging model

What will PR look like when it emerges?

Yesterday I posted about changes in the media landscape and suggested that PR is still a viable and important activity for non-profits wishing to build their image and reputation… but it is not PR as we’ve loved and known it.  Taking a page from the strategic planning toolkit, I thought it might be useful to contrast features of traditional PR with emerging PR approaches with a “to” and “from” chart.  Caution:  I may revert to using the phrase “paradigm shift” again (JK)!  And forgive me for not creating and embedding a Powerpoint slide (I tend to agree with an quote from an Atlantic Monthly article, “Before there was Powerpoint, there were conversations).

The “to/from” chart below isn’t meant to be definitive.  It’s intended to provoke your thinking about your choice of tactics, what skills you hire for, and how you measure progress and success.

FROM — > — > TO

PR pros’ value based on: reporter relationships — >knowledge of channels for distributing messages

A big win with the boss would look like:  positive newspaper feature — > audience exposure across traditional and online channels, comments, sharing, response

Communication direction:  mostly one-way — >two-way (not broadcasting, but conversing)

Channel size:  big audience conduits  — > communicating to smaller audiences, even individuals

Message control:  controlling the message  — > adapting the message, sometimes watching the adaptation

Approvals:  clear top-down sign offs  — > more flexible guidelines and autonomy

Spokespersons:  clear, controlled messengers  — > collaboration with constituents who have relationships

Materials:  one statement or release  — > story adapted and pushed across many channels

Medium:  written (narrative)  — > shorter texts, even fragments; video, photos

So, PR and non-profit friends, what do you think?  How will PR need to evolve?  Throw in some attributes of your own!

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More about changes in the media landscape, from Pew

Post-before-last, I took stock of changes in the local media landscape over the past year and made some observations about what those changes mean for nonprofits that must vie to build awareness of their missions.

This week, the Pew Project for Excellence in Journalism, one of seven initiatives of the Pew Research Center, produced its sixth annual report on the State of the News Media and it’s a must-read.  The business model for news gathering and reporting continues to founder, leading to what the report calls “chilling” numbers for newspapers, local TV and the ethnic press.

On the other hand, the stampede to online sources means that audiences now consume news in new ways, leading the report to observe, “They hunt and gather what they want when they want it, use search to comb among destinations and share what they find through a growing network of social media.”  Alternative news sites also continue to grow (although many have a beat that focuses on government and politics, with limited interest in nonprofits per se).

Two special reports that were included in this year’s Pew analysis may be of particular value to nonprofits:

Based on the study and my own local observations, I’m sticking with my opinion that is is difficult but not impossible to employ public relations techniques to build awareness of nonprofits in this post-apocalyptic news media period.  The trick is that they’re not the same old public relations techniques.  Maybe I’ll post more about that tomorrow!

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One year later: media changes and what it means for non-profit PR

Jordan Blair, Board member, has helped develop RCFB's social media capability

Last year, I wrote a series of posts on the good, the bad and the ugly, referring to the virtual collapse of the news industry and what it means for non-profits that rely on “earned” media for exposure.  As I reflect on the success of yesterday’s Empty Bowls event benefiting River City Food Bank here in Sacramento, I thought I’d pass along some observations about what worked and why.

But first, some trend info.  Two months ago, Vocus*, a program that integrates news monitoring, media targeting/list management and other tools, released a free analysis called “State of the Media.”  A few highlights:

  • 230 newspaper weeklies shut down in 2009 along with 14 dailies
  • TV stations that didn’t close sought ways to cut costs.  They began sharing news footage and cut to skeleton crews.  To retain viewers and fill content holes, Vocus media analysts suggest that stations will gravitate toward a less news-based format
  • Radio stations’ advertising revenue has fallen short, causing stations to reduce local programming and rely more on syndicated shows.  On the other hand, streaming has grown by leaps and bounds.
  • Newspaper, magazines, TV and radio began integrating with social media.  Hard to find a reporter who’s not blogging, tweeting or on Facebook.
  • Online, locally focused news media will continue to crop up – some as non-profit journalism projects like the Bay Area News Project (just launching) or citizen journalism sites like sacramentopress.com.

Despite all of the gloomy news, Empty Bowls continues to gain momentum in terms of news coverage and participation.  Mind you, this isn’t a giant fundraiser backed by a non-profit that’s a household name here.  This is a scrappy fundraiser organized by a scrappy organization.  This year the event expanded and attracted an estimated 1,100 participants and raised $80,000.

Here’s the approach that Susan Bitar, PR chair, Jordan Blair, Board member in charge of PR, and 3Fold Communications (with a little help from yours truly) took, with good success:

  1. The organization made good use of its website, e-newsletter and its network of friends.  E-newsletters about the event achieved open rates ranging from 35-38%, with up to 40% clicking through to the website to do something (like buy tickets).  45% of attendees were first timers, and many said they heard about it from friends, the website and the e-newsletter. By the way, draft email messages were shared with the Board and committee and they were encouraged to send them to their friends.
  2. Most of the PR resources were focused on an event created for purposes of pre-publicity.  The Vocus report notes:  …”you need to be willing to bend over backward to accommodate (journalists) so they can easily meet their constantly impending deadline.”  No kidding.  We were able to get high school students to show up for media activity at 6 a.m..  One got up at 3 a.m. to do homework and get to the school in plenty of time.  (Wow, WAY different than my high school aged son!)  Around here, local news happens early.
  3. 3Fold arranged a collaboration with Yelp, which distributes an e-newsletter to more than 38,000 locals in the area.  Yelp deemed the event a sponsor (and gave it nice positioning in its newsletter) in exchange for placing Yelp logos on the website and writing about it in the e-newsletter.  3Fold also created an event in Yelp, which brought in at least two new people who heard about it that way (according to comment cards collected at the event).  Two attendees wrote glowing reviews about the event on Yelp.  And, of course, Yelp is regularly crawled by Google and Bing – so that content may end up going far afield as people search for related information.
  4. News articles were provided to organizations that are involved in some way with the event, from churches to schools.  Many people also noted that they heard about the event through their child’s school or through their church.
  5. Local celebs were invited to participate.  Not only did KCRA’s Edie Lambert delight the crowd, she brought a news camera and talked about her participation on several news cast.  But you might not have caught this:  she also did a “raw” video that was posted on the website, a wonderfully compelling testimonial.  http://www.kcra.com/video/22789636/index.html.
  6. Of course, the event was pushed through Facebook.  Photos of the event were posted immediately, along with two rough videos taken on an HD Flip Video.  (The fan page administrator just uploads into the “video” tab on the fan page site, and then clicks “share.”)
  7. The event did the basics, too, calendar listings (three months in advance), media advisories, fact sheets, specialized pitches, and so on.

As Vocus acknowledges, it’s harder to develop trusted relationships with reporters.  There are too few of them, and they’re trying to cover too many bases given the news organizations’ limited staffing.  On the other hand, it’s easier than ever to become a “content pusher.”  Find the local outlets like sacramentopress.com.  Release information so it gets picked up by search engines and regional online publications.  Feed video and photos throughout social media.

It takes a lot of leg work, but it can produce results!

*I’m not sure I trust any company that uses “leverage” and “ubiquity” in one sentence, but that’s just me (small jest there)… but here’s a little more about what Vocus says it does (for a price, of course):  “provides the ability to leverage the ubiquity of the internet to interact with the media, publish their news online where it can be found by millions, monitor news and social media conversations from virtually any source and track their results to compare them with key competitors.”

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What to do when the news media doesn’t show

Sometimes you feel like Cinderella all dressed up for the ball, without the fairy godmother and carriage.  Promoting events for non-profits can feel like that, especially as reporters become an endangered species.  All it takes is a little rain or snow around these parts to send the few reporters and cameras scurrying everywhere but to your carefully orchestrated event.

What’s a nice non-profit to do?  Make the best of a disappointing situation.

Aggressively jump on every social media outlet you can think of, and give your followers the tools to tell their friends.

Case in point this morning:  a wonderful group of students came in at an hour when most of their peers were still in dreamland to finish up some bowls they were donating for the March 8 & 9th Empty Bowls event, which benefits River City Food Bank.  Heavy snow and rain sent reporters and cameras scrambling up to the snow or over to car crashes.  It was pretty lonely at Vista del Lago High School in Folsom.

Though it’s no substitute for mass media, here’s what we did.  (And I was kicking myself later for not bringing my high def Flip video, since a number of the news stations accept and post user-generated videos.)

1.  We quickly posted, captioned and tagged photos on the agency’s flickr account.

2.  Uploaded photos to RCFB’s Facebook fan page and encouraged fans/friends to tag themselves so that the photos get out to an even wider distribution, quickly.

3.  Posted Facebook status updates with links to photos.

4.  Published an article and photo on sacramentopress.com (you can check it out here at http://www.sacramentopress.com/headline/22532/Vista_del_Lago_students_bowl_against_hunger).  I talked about Sacramentopress.com last June, which seems thus far to be leading the race among various “citizen journalist” outlets.

5.  Posted photos an a brief description on the leading television news’ station’s “u local” social media component.  News stations’ website search engines are getting better and better, and my hope is that this story becomes “findable” when people look for related information in the future.  (Also posted photos on another news’ station’s “member” social media feature, but I can’t figure out how people would ever retrieve the information.)

So, it ain’t over when the news fairy fails to wave her magic wand in your direction.  Do-it-yourself distribution is never easy, but we have more tools than ever before to communicate with our networks of friends… and their networks of friends… and their network of friends…

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Not-to-late for the holidays tip #2: Set up a Google Alert

Old fashioned public relations has a lot to offer as part of the holiday fundraising mix, even in this time of the Great Shrinking News Media.

National news stories researched and reported by sources like the AP are having have an increasing influence on local news outlets.  Besides using their content outright, editors may hunt for a local tie-in.

So here’s not-to-late tip #2:  take advantage of Google Alert.  Google Alert is a cheap way of staying on top of news that might represent an opportunity for your non-profit, besides its value as a basic listening tool.

Example:  the US Department of Agriculture released a report this week that documented a rapid rise in hunger, which triggered an AP story.  Cynthia Hubert, a Sacramento Bee reporter, localized the story of the federal data by reaching out to local non-profits that provide emergency food and shelter.  Having a Google Alert set up for “hunger”, for example, could give food closets and other emergency social service providers a chance to suggest a local angle to key news organizations.

Even if your call to an editor or reporter doesn’t result in a story, you can still construct a brief news release regarding your organization’s data or experience, and use the information  in electronic or printed materials to add credibility to your messages.

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